More search options
We are looking in more than 100 shops for your best offer - please wait…
- Shipping costs to Philippines (modify to GBR, USA, AUS, NZL, IND, CHN, JPN)
Create preset

All books for 9780332068572 - compare every offer

9780332068572 - Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) als Buch von James Hinton - Book
1

Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) als Buch von James Hinton (?)

Delivery from: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandBook is in english languageNew bookreprint

ISBN: 9780332068572 (?) or 0332068579, in english, Forgotten Books, New, reprint

PHP 3,100 ( 49.99)¹ + Shipping: PHP 1,550 ( 25.00)¹ = PHP 4,660 ( 74.99)¹(without obligation)
From Seller/Antiquarian
Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) ab 49.99 EURO
Seller order number: 30956066
Platform order number Ebook.de: 21374574704
Category: Bücher > English, International > Gebundene Ausgaben
Data from 01/07/2018 01:05h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-332-06857-9, 978-0-332-06857-2
9780332068572 - James Hinton: Selections from Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (Hardback) - Book
2
James Hinton (?):

Selections from Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (Hardback) (2017) (?)

Delivery from: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandBook is in english languageThis book is a hardcover book not a paperbackNew bookreprint

ISBN: 9780332068572 (?) or 0332068579, in english, Forgotten Books, hardcover, New, reprint

PHP 3,150 ($ 61.13)¹(free shipping, without obligation)
Free shipping
From Seller/Antiquarian, The Book Depository US [58762574], London, United Kingdom
Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Excerpt from Selections From Manuscripts It is only because all things have a dependence on and relation to a spiritual actuality that language exists at all. Man speaks because he is a spiritual Being. Without this spiritual meaning of things, and therefore of words, language is an impossibility. Beasts do not speak because they have not things around them [perhaps they perceive matter and motion only]. So there is great significance in a child s beginning to speak; it shows moral Being, a perception of things. The two go together. Mere matter and motion could not be tied to such a spiritual thing as language, still less could give birth to it. And that words shd necessarily designate physical things, too, is very clear, for it is only so that they can designate spiritual facts: they cannot mean one without meaning the other, because the two are inseparable. Words do affirm the identity of the physical and the spiritual. See how the word real in some cases affirms too little, in others too much: a real God, too little; God is not real, He is actual, is Being: real matter, too much; matter is ideal. In truth, how can we wonder at the perplexity and mystery in wh all our conceptions of tho true nature of Being and of our relations to God, of the spiritual and the physical alike, are involved ? What could be more adapted to produce them than the considering as real a fiction like matter; the embodying in thingality that wh has not a single property in common with things? It is Science with its hypotheses and fictions, represented as real, that has put us all astray. A real matter accounts for it all; with such a chimera filling our imaginations how could we see? Science demands such hypotheses for her advance but that is all the use they have, and when they have fulfilled this end the only course of wisdom is at once and most willingly to drop them. But the pity is that when by our hypotheses we have rendered things obscure we will insist that the obscurity is in the things themselves, and will not see simplicity, because we have made up our minds that such knowledge is beyond the grasp of the human mind. I grant that in the real-matter hypothesis it is very little indeed, worth knowing, that can be known. The choice is between going on to try to imagine a real matter, or to see the actual - to know. It may be argued, perhaps, that things are matter and force in a certain form: and this looks formidable at first. But observe (1) things are not mere matter and force in a certain form, they have a meaning, a relation to us, by wh they are things. And hence see: things clearly can only be from a relation to mind or a percipient, there arc and can be no things without a percipient. This is the truth, surely, of Ferrier, when he obscures by mixing up the idea of matter. An essential mental element is involved in things. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
seller comment The Book Depository US [58762574], London, United Kingdom:
Seller rating: 5, NEW BOOK, New
Platform order number Abebooks.com: 22665326994
Data from 01/07/2018 01:05h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-332-06857-9, 978-0-332-06857-2
9780332068572 - James Hinton: Selections from Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (Hardback) - Book
3
James Hinton (?):

Selections from Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (Hardback) (2017) (?)

Delivery from: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandBook is in english languageThis book is a hardcover book not a paperbackNew bookreprint

ISBN: 9780332068572 (?) or 0332068579, in english, Forgotten Books, hardcover, New, reprint

PHP 3,260 ($ 63.22)¹(free shipping, without obligation)
Free shipping
From Seller/Antiquarian, The Book Depository [54837791], London, United Kingdom
Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Excerpt from Selections From Manuscripts It is only because all things have a dependence on and relation to a spiritual actuality that language exists at all. Man speaks because he is a spiritual Being. Without this spiritual meaning of things, and therefore of words, language is an impossibility. Beasts do not speak because they have not things around them [perhaps they perceive matter and motion only]. So there is great significance in a child s beginning to speak; it shows moral Being, a perception of things. The two go together. Mere matter and motion could not be tied to such a spiritual thing as language, still less could give birth to it. And that words shd necessarily designate physical things, too, is very clear, for it is only so that they can designate spiritual facts: they cannot mean one without meaning the other, because the two are inseparable. Words do affirm the identity of the physical and the spiritual. See how the word real in some cases affirms too little, in others too much: a real God, too little; God is not real, He is actual, is Being: real matter, too much; matter is ideal. In truth, how can we wonder at the perplexity and mystery in wh all our conceptions of tho true nature of Being and of our relations to God, of the spiritual and the physical alike, are involved ? What could be more adapted to produce them than the considering as real a fiction like matter; the embodying in thingality that wh has not a single property in common with things? It is Science with its hypotheses and fictions, represented as real, that has put us all astray. A real matter accounts for it all; with such a chimera filling our imaginations how could we see? Science demands such hypotheses for her advance but that is all the use they have, and when they have fulfilled this end the only course of wisdom is at once and most willingly to drop them. But the pity is that when by our hypotheses we have rendered things obscure we will insist that the obscurity is in the things themselves, and will not see simplicity, because we have made up our minds that such knowledge is beyond the grasp of the human mind. I grant that in the real-matter hypothesis it is very little indeed, worth knowing, that can be known. The choice is between going on to try to imagine a real matter, or to see the actual - to know. It may be argued, perhaps, that things are matter and force in a certain form: and this looks formidable at first. But observe (1) things are not mere matter and force in a certain form, they have a meaning, a relation to us, by wh they are things. And hence see: things clearly can only be from a relation to mind or a percipient, there arc and can be no things without a percipient. This is the truth, surely, of Ferrier, when he obscures by mixing up the idea of matter. An essential mental element is involved in things. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
seller comment The Book Depository [54837791], London, United Kingdom:
Seller rating: 5, NEW BOOK, New
Platform order number Abebooks.com: 22665425579
Data from 01/07/2018 01:05h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-332-06857-9, 978-0-332-06857-2
9780332068572 - Hinton, James: Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) - Book
4
Hinton, James (?):

Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (2017) (?)

Delivery from: United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandBook is in english languageThis is a paperback bookNew bookreprint

ISBN: 9780332068572 (?) or 0332068579, in english, Forgotten Books, Paperback, New, reprint

PHP 2,870 ($ 55.63)¹ + Shipping: PHP 270 ($ 5.25)¹ = PHP 3,140 ($ 60.88)¹(without obligation)
From Seller/Antiquarian, Ria Christie Collections [59718070], Uxbridge, United Kingdom
PRINT ON DEMAND Book; New; Publication Year 2017; Not Signed; Fast Shipping from the UK.
seller comment Ria Christie Collections [59718070], Uxbridge, United Kingdom:
Seller rating: 5, NEW BOOK, New
Platform order number Abebooks.com: 22656509024
Keywords: SELECTIONS FROM MANUSCRIPTS (CLASSIC REPRINT)
Data from 01/07/2018 01:05h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-332-06857-9, 978-0-332-06857-2
9780332068572 - James Hinton: Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) - Book
5
James Hinton (?):

Selections From Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (2017) (?)

Delivery from: United States of AmericaBook is in english languageThis book is a hardcover book not a paperbackNew bookreprint

ISBN: 9780332068572 (?) or 0332068579, in english, 802 pages, Forgotten Books, hardcover, New, reprint

PHP 2,080 ($ 40.44)¹(free shipping, without obligation)
Usually ships in 24 hours, free shipping for AmazonPrime only. Regular USD 4.98
From Seller/Antiquarian, Amazon.com
Excerpt from Selections From ManuscriptsIt is only because all things have a dependence on and relation to a spiritual 'actuality' that language exists at all. Man speaks because he is a spiritual Being. Without this spiritual meaning of things, and therefore of words, language is an impossibility. Beasts do not speak because they have not 'things' around them [perhaps they perceive 'matter and motion' only]. So there is great significance in a child's beginning to speak; it shows moral Being, a perception of 'things.' The two go together. Mere matter and motion could not be tied to such a spiritual thing as language, still less could give birth to it. And that words shd necessarily designate physical things, too, is very clear, for it is only so that they can designate spiritual facts: they cannot mean one without meaning the other, because the two are inseparable. Words do affirm the identity of the physical and the spiritual.See how the word 'real' in some cases affirms too little, in others too much: a real God, too little; God is not real, He is actual, is Being: real matter, too much; matter is ideal. In truth, how can we wonder at the perplexity and mystery in wh all our conceptions of tho true nature of Being and of our relations to God, of the spiritual and the physical alike, are involved ? What could be more adapted to produce them than the considering as real a fiction like matter; the embodying in thingality that wh has not a single property in common with things? It is Science with its hypotheses and fictions, represented as real, that has put us all astray. A 'real matter' accounts for it all; with such a chimera filling our imaginations how could we see? Science demands such hypotheses for her advance but that is all the use they have, and when they have fulfilled this end the only course of wisdom is at once and most willingly to drop them. But the pity is that when by our hypotheses we have rendered things obscure we will insist that the obscurity is in the things themselves, and will not see simplicity, because we have made up our minds that such knowledge is beyond the grasp of the human mind. I grant that in the real-matter hypothesis it is very little indeed, worth knowing, that can be known. The choice is between going on to try to imagine a real matter, or to see the actual - to know. It may be argued, perhaps, that 'things' are matter and force in a certain form : and this looks formidable at first. But observe (1) 'things' are not mere matter and force in a certain form, they have a meaning, a relation to us, by wh they are 'things.' And hence see: things clearly can only be from a relation to mind or a percipient, there arc and can be no things without a percipient. This is the truth, surely, of Ferrier, when he obscures by mixing up the idea of matter. An essential mental element is involved in 'things.'About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works. hardcover, Label: Forgotten Books, Forgotten Books, Product group: Book, Published: 2017-11-27, Studio: Forgotten Books
Platform order number Amazon.com: i3gjQ3%2Bg8Uja75gmyhR9KTXl2tlC fbLbQ%2F6wukitSkMdWtGVLQWDaZsz 0RkwhXHlsE4%2BTIsbFAMD8XTZThpQ VJnZlhoF2EjezDCRvdhaYjgcFkpKop 12bA%3D%3D
Keywords: Books, Self-Help, Spiritual
Data from 01/07/2018 01:05h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-332-06857-9, 978-0-332-06857-2

9780332068572

Find all available books for your ISBN number 9780332068572 compare prices fast and easily and order immediatly.

Available rare books, used books and second hand books of the title "Selections from Manuscripts (Classic Reprint) (Hardback)" from Hinton, James are completely listed.

Books nearby

>> to Archive