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PricesJanuary 2014February 2014December 2014
MeanPHP 660 ( 10.99)¹ PHP 1,680 ( 27.92)¹ PHP 2,020 ( 33.56)¹
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9780271024639 - Margaret Morton: Glass House
1
Margaret Morton (?):

Glass House (2004) (?)

ISBN: 9780271024639 (?) or 0271024631, in english, 160 pages, Penn State University Press, hardcover, Used

PHP 580 ($ 12.99)¹ + Shipping: PHP 180 ($ 3.99)¹ = PHP 760 ($ 16.98)¹(without obligation)
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
From Seller/Antiquarian, Full Paper Jacket
Penn State Press interview with Margaret Morton, March 2004.Your books—The Tunnel; Fragile Dwelling; Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives; and now Glass House—always use a place in their titles and often present photographs of sites throughout New York City. Why these titles? Why so many photographs of the places where the homeless gather to find shelter?From the beginning, my work was devoted not to despair but rather to the courage and imagination with which people face adversity, the ways they manage to build makeshift structures and find warmth and community. I try to show that the term "homeless" is a misnomer that blinds us from seeing how people preserve their sense of home and identity while struggling for survival at the margins of society.How does Glass House fit into your earlier work?Unlike my other books, which are about adults, Glass House focuses upon a group of young people—some were runaways—who in 1993 established a communal home in an abandoned glass factory on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.How did you find out about Glass House and get access to the community?I learned about Glass House from a homeless man whom I had photographed. He introduced me to Gentle Spike, one of the members of the community, who told me to meet him at Avenue D and East 10th Street on a Sunday night at 9 pm. "If no one is there," he said, "just yell 'Glass House.'" When I arrived at the seven-story building that next Sunday, it was completely dark and looked deserted. I waited a few minutes, then yelled "Glass House." Silence. I yelled again. Suddenly, a thick chain came hurtling down. I had the keys. I found my way to the second floor and a dimly lit, unheated room where about thirty-five people between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two were conducting what they called a "house meeting." "A stranger, a documentarian," was on the agenda. I showed them a copy of my first book, Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives. Discussion, a show of hands, then a woman slammed a sledgehammer on a table: I had been given permission to take photographs and conduct interviews as they continued their lives in this derelict brick building. After that night and for the next four months, I attended Thursday workdays, Sunday night house meetings, and met with individual residents.Why do you think they accepted you?These young men and women in Glass House had had many adults—teachers, parents, police—try to impose codes of behavior on them that they considered cruel or irrational or just too restrictive. I think that from the first they understood I would not judge them by society’s norms of conduct. I accepted them as they were. Then, too, I believe the people in Glass House wanted to tell their stories, to present their experiences to a society they thought had been unwilling or unable to understand them. They decided they could trust me to record their way of life.Glass House seems to have been a tightly regulated community, indeed, seems to have been better organized than most communities and institutions on "the outside." How did they go about keeping order?They took turns doing essential duties, built what was needed with what they could find, and took care of one another. Each and every one was required to respect house rules, which were strict and detailed, covering almost every eventuality from overnight guests to police raids. Here, for instance, is the guest policy: "You can’t stay at Glass House unless you are the guest of a member. If you are the guest of a member, you can only sleep in his or her room. Glass House is not a crash pad. You can’t sleep in the community room or in any other part of the house. All guests must attend Sunday night meetings, so we know your face. Any strangers will be escorted to the door.You photographed Glass House from 1993 to 1994. Why did you wait so long to publish the material as a book?Four months after I began my work, the police stormed the building and evicted everyone. I put aside my photographs, transcripts, and notes and turned to other projects. Then, a few years ago, a letter from one of the Glass House survivors prompted me to trace all the other former residents. I was saddened to learn that five of them had died, and impressed that many others had dramatically changed their lives. One now lives in a eucalyptus forest on Maui; another is an organic gardener in Costa Rica; yet another is preparing for law school. But all I contacted told me that their months in Glass House had been a turning point in their lives. Also it seems right to present this chronicle of young squatters at a time when gentrification is erasing virtually all traces of the ethnic groups and radical fringe that once gave Alphabet City such great diversity and vitality., hardcover, Label: Penn State University Press, Penn State University Press, Produktgruppe: Book, Publiziert: 2004-09-16, Studio: Penn State University Press, Verkaufsrang: 1409290
Platform order number Amazon.com: EI9X%2FrqbC3do%2B28M6DpNaGkdEh LlKDtMBZeKQqW5r3945r34c9EZQIfo jZDlnmvm4EH4MkIPOFy1LwQM59WyAY D%2BwYcc1If4ZO5hBrM4hOYwky8WIL gKKIAAjl0cnAMwiHX4EPl%2F4mVyU6 wE5vIljQ%3D%3D
Keywords: Books, Arts & Photography, Photo Essays, History, Americas, United States, 20th Century, State & Local, Politics & Social Sciences, Urban Planning & Development, Poverty, Sociology, Politics & Government, Specific Topics, Civics & Citizenship, Public Affairs & Policy, City Planning & Urban Development
Data from 02/03/2014 05:02h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-271-02463-1, 978-0-271-02463-9
9780271024639 - Margaret Morton: Glass House
2
Margaret Morton (?):

Glass House (2004) (?)

ISBN: 9780271024639 (?) or 0271024631, in english, 160 pages, Penn State University Press, hardcover, Used

PHP 1,600 ($ 36.00)¹ + Shipping: PHP 180 ($ 3.99)¹ = PHP 1,780 ($ 39.99)¹(without obligation)
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
From Seller/Antiquarian, AbeBooks Marketplace Rare & Collectibles
Penn State Press interview with Margaret Morton, March 2004.Your books—The Tunnel; Fragile Dwelling; Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives; and now Glass House—always use a place in their titles and often present photographs of sites throughout New York City. Why these titles? Why so many photographs of the places where the homeless gather to find shelter?From the beginning, my work was devoted not to despair but rather to the courage and imagination with which people face adversity, the ways they manage to build makeshift structures and find warmth and community. I try to show that the term "homeless" is a misnomer that blinds us from seeing how people preserve their sense of home and identity while struggling for survival at the margins of society.How does Glass House fit into your earlier work?Unlike my other books, which are about adults, Glass House focuses upon a group of young people—some were runaways—who in 1993 established a communal home in an abandoned glass factory on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.How did you find out about Glass House and get access to the community?I learned about Glass House from a homeless man whom I had photographed. He introduced me to Gentle Spike, one of the members of the community, who told me to meet him at Avenue D and East 10th Street on a Sunday night at 9 pm. "If no one is there," he said, "just yell 'Glass House.'" When I arrived at the seven-story building that next Sunday, it was completely dark and looked deserted. I waited a few minutes, then yelled "Glass House." Silence. I yelled again. Suddenly, a thick chain came hurtling down. I had the keys. I found my way to the second floor and a dimly lit, unheated room where about thirty-five people between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two were conducting what they called a "house meeting." "A stranger, a documentarian," was on the agenda. I showed them a copy of my first book, Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives. Discussion, a show of hands, then a woman slammed a sledgehammer on a table: I had been given permission to take photographs and conduct interviews as they continued their lives in this derelict brick building. After that night and for the next four months, I attended Thursday workdays, Sunday night house meetings, and met with individual residents.Why do you think they accepted you?These young men and women in Glass House had had many adults—teachers, parents, police—try to impose codes of behavior on them that they considered cruel or irrational or just too restrictive. I think that from the first they understood I would not judge them by society’s norms of conduct. I accepted them as they were. Then, too, I believe the people in Glass House wanted to tell their stories, to present their experiences to a society they thought had been unwilling or unable to understand them. They decided they could trust me to record their way of life.Glass House seems to have been a tightly regulated community, indeed, seems to have been better organized than most communities and institutions on "the outside." How did they go about keeping order?They took turns doing essential duties, built what was needed with what they could find, and took care of one another. Each and every one was required to respect house rules, which were strict and detailed, covering almost every eventuality from overnight guests to police raids. Here, for instance, is the guest policy: "You can’t stay at Glass House unless you are the guest of a member. If you are the guest of a member, you can only sleep in his or her room. Glass House is not a crash pad. You can’t sleep in the community room or in any other part of the house. All guests must attend Sunday night meetings, so we know your face. Any strangers will be escorted to the door.You photographed Glass House from 1993 to 1994. Why did you wait so long to publish the material as a book?Four months after I began my work, the police stormed the building and evicted everyone. I put aside my photographs, transcripts, and notes and turned to other projects. Then, a few years ago, a letter from one of the Glass House survivors prompted me to trace all the other former residents. I was saddened to learn that five of them had died, and impressed that many others had dramatically changed their lives. One now lives in a eucalyptus forest on Maui; another is an organic gardener in Costa Rica; yet another is preparing for law school. But all I contacted told me that their months in Glass House had been a turning point in their lives. Also it seems right to present this chronicle of young squatters at a time when gentrification is erasing virtually all traces of the ethnic groups and radical fringe that once gave Alphabet City such great diversity and vitality., hardcover, Label: Penn State University Press, Penn State University Press, Produktgruppe: Book, Publiziert: 2004-09-16, Studio: Penn State University Press, Verkaufsrang: 1409290
seller comment AbeBooks Marketplace Rare & Collectibles:
Sammlerstück
Platform order number Amazon.com: 7fZtHj%2BWFi6eSSnv9lUVVNgCp5aJ zrL66T70z4zeXLB0EaWd8uFIxKh20h EQG4ax%2FhlNyGT88xw0OERmSKXsUG Vid0klqtqMfpm33ybbBtNn9B8ptOX8 zwjwVKxezWegK6obIvqUaCKh0o1Dnz VqdgN3hqoRL4fu
Keywords: Books, Arts & Photography, Photo Essays, History, Americas, United States, 20th Century, State & Local, Politics & Social Sciences, Urban Planning & Development, Poverty, Sociology, Politics & Government, Specific Topics, Civics & Citizenship, Public Affairs & Policy, City Planning & Urban Development
Data from 02/03/2014 05:02h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-271-02463-1, 978-0-271-02463-9
9780271024639 - Margaret Morton: Glass House
3
Margaret Morton (?):

Glass House (2004) (?)

ISBN: 9780271024639 (?) or 0271024631, in english, 160 pages, Penn State University Press, hardcover, New

PHP 1,600 ($ 35.87)¹ + Shipping: PHP 180 ($ 3.99)¹ = PHP 1,780 ($ 39.86)¹(without obligation)
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
From Seller/Antiquarian, Red Rhino
Penn State Press interview with Margaret Morton, March 2004.Your books—The Tunnel; Fragile Dwelling; Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives; and now Glass House—always use a place in their titles and often present photographs of sites throughout New York City. Why these titles? Why so many photographs of the places where the homeless gather to find shelter?From the beginning, my work was devoted not to despair but rather to the courage and imagination with which people face adversity, the ways they manage to build makeshift structures and find warmth and community. I try to show that the term "homeless" is a misnomer that blinds us from seeing how people preserve their sense of home and identity while struggling for survival at the margins of society.How does Glass House fit into your earlier work?Unlike my other books, which are about adults, Glass House focuses upon a group of young people—some were runaways—who in 1993 established a communal home in an abandoned glass factory on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.How did you find out about Glass House and get access to the community?I learned about Glass House from a homeless man whom I had photographed. He introduced me to Gentle Spike, one of the members of the community, who told me to meet him at Avenue D and East 10th Street on a Sunday night at 9 pm. "If no one is there," he said, "just yell 'Glass House.'" When I arrived at the seven-story building that next Sunday, it was completely dark and looked deserted. I waited a few minutes, then yelled "Glass House." Silence. I yelled again. Suddenly, a thick chain came hurtling down. I had the keys. I found my way to the second floor and a dimly lit, unheated room where about thirty-five people between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two were conducting what they called a "house meeting." "A stranger, a documentarian," was on the agenda. I showed them a copy of my first book, Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives. Discussion, a show of hands, then a woman slammed a sledgehammer on a table: I had been given permission to take photographs and conduct interviews as they continued their lives in this derelict brick building. After that night and for the next four months, I attended Thursday workdays, Sunday night house meetings, and met with individual residents.Why do you think they accepted you?These young men and women in Glass House had had many adults—teachers, parents, police—try to impose codes of behavior on them that they considered cruel or irrational or just too restrictive. I think that from the first they understood I would not judge them by society’s norms of conduct. I accepted them as they were. Then, too, I believe the people in Glass House wanted to tell their stories, to present their experiences to a society they thought had been unwilling or unable to understand them. They decided they could trust me to record their way of life.Glass House seems to have been a tightly regulated community, indeed, seems to have been better organized than most communities and institutions on "the outside." How did they go about keeping order?They took turns doing essential duties, built what was needed with what they could find, and took care of one another. Each and every one was required to respect house rules, which were strict and detailed, covering almost every eventuality from overnight guests to police raids. Here, for instance, is the guest policy: "You can’t stay at Glass House unless you are the guest of a member. If you are the guest of a member, you can only sleep in his or her room. Glass House is not a crash pad. You can’t sleep in the community room or in any other part of the house. All guests must attend Sunday night meetings, so we know your face. Any strangers will be escorted to the door.You photographed Glass House from 1993 to 1994. Why did you wait so long to publish the material as a book?Four months after I began my work, the police stormed the building and evicted everyone. I put aside my photographs, transcripts, and notes and turned to other projects. Then, a few years ago, a letter from one of the Glass House survivors prompted me to trace all the other former residents. I was saddened to learn that five of them had died, and impressed that many others had dramatically changed their lives. One now lives in a eucalyptus forest on Maui; another is an organic gardener in Costa Rica; yet another is preparing for law school. But all I contacted told me that their months in Glass House had been a turning point in their lives. Also it seems right to present this chronicle of young squatters at a time when gentrification is erasing virtually all traces of the ethnic groups and radical fringe that once gave Alphabet City such great diversity and vitality., hardcover, Label: Penn State University Press, Penn State University Press, Produktgruppe: Book, Publiziert: 2004-09-16, Studio: Penn State University Press, Verkaufsrang: 1409290
Platform order number Amazon.com: mcIes%2FDg4opaTgQktgBObQzEzuvD 7vG1WCj2oyhYwIQks7fJ1fDDY2XmbD jaA3fakAugw1jk6a3I57hVH9lUs34G l8ph7Y7DqisWnXjyr98eOkSzERV6sf k2XEhELGsaIpRyhFRESQBJ4xoF7YE9 26GDGK6DNYtH
Keywords: Books, Arts & Photography, Photo Essays, History, Americas, United States, 20th Century, State & Local, Politics & Social Sciences, Urban Planning & Development, Poverty, Sociology, Politics & Government, Specific Topics, Civics & Citizenship, Public Affairs & Policy, City Planning & Urban Development
Data from 02/03/2014 05:02h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-271-02463-1, 978-0-271-02463-9
9780271024639 - MORTON, MARGARET: Glass House
4
MORTON, MARGARET (?):

Glass House (2004) (?)

ISBN: 9780271024639 (?) or 0271024631, in english, Pennsylvania State University Press, Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, hardcover, Used

PHP 1,850 ( 30.76)¹ + Shipping: PHP 370 ( 6.09)¹ = PHP 2,210 ( 36.85)¹(without obligation)
From Seller/Antiquarian, Ripping Yarns [145891], London, United Kingdom
Grey boards with dustwrapper, 151pp. Documentary photographs of the homeless squatters of an abandoned glass factory in New York. Dw bumped at base of spine otherwise very good. Please note this is a heavy book and may need extra postage - please contact us directly for best rate.
seller comment Ripping Yarns [145891], London, United Kingdom:
Händlerbewertung: 4, NOT NEW BOOK, Very Good
Platform order number Abebooks.de: 4800291222
Category: Political Science |Public Policy|City Planning & Urban Development, Political Science |Civics & Citizenship, History|United States |General
Keywords: NEW YORK, PHOTOGRAPHY, HOMELESSNESS, SQUATTERS
Data from 02/03/2014 05:02h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-271-02463-1, 978-0-271-02463-9
9780271024639 - Margaret Morton: Glass House
5
Margaret Morton (?):

Glass House (2004) (?)

ISBN: 9780271024639 (?) or 0271024631, in english, 160 pages, Penn State University Press, hardcover, New, first edition

PHP 1,690 ($ 35.00)¹ + Shipping: PHP 190 ($ 3.99)¹ = PHP 1,880 ($ 38.99)¹(without obligation)
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
From Seller/Antiquarian, Doggy-Doo Books
Penn State Press interview with Margaret Morton, March 2004.Your books—The Tunnel; Fragile Dwelling; Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives; and now Glass House—always use a place in their titles and often present photographs of sites throughout New York City. Why these titles? Why so many photographs of the places where the homeless gather to find shelter?From the beginning, my work was devoted not to despair but rather to the courage and imagination with which people face adversity, the ways they manage to build makeshift structures and find warmth and community. I try to show that the term "homeless" is a misnomer that blinds us from seeing how people preserve their sense of home and identity while struggling for survival at the margins of society.How does Glass House fit into your earlier work?Unlike my other books, which are about adults, Glass House focuses upon a group of young people—some were runaways—who in 1993 established a communal home in an abandoned glass factory on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.How did you find out about Glass House and get access to the community?I learned about Glass House from a homeless man whom I had photographed. He introduced me to Gentle Spike, one of the members of the community, who told me to meet him at Avenue D and East 10th Street on a Sunday night at 9 pm. "If no one is there," he said, "just yell 'Glass House.'" When I arrived at the seven-story building that next Sunday, it was completely dark and looked deserted. I waited a few minutes, then yelled "Glass House." Silence. I yelled again. Suddenly, a thick chain came hurtling down. I had the keys. I found my way to the second floor and a dimly lit, unheated room where about thirty-five people between the ages of seventeen and twenty-two were conducting what they called a "house meeting." "A stranger, a documentarian," was on the agenda. I showed them a copy of my first book, Transitory Gardens, Uprooted Lives. Discussion, a show of hands, then a woman slammed a sledgehammer on a table: I had been given permission to take photographs and conduct interviews as they continued their lives in this derelict brick building. After that night and for the next four months, I attended Thursday workdays, Sunday night house meetings, and met with individual residents.Why do you think they accepted you?These young men and women in Glass House had had many adults—teachers, parents, police—try to impose codes of behavior on them that they considered cruel or irrational or just too restrictive. I think that from the first they understood I would not judge them by society’s norms of conduct. I accepted them as they were. Then, too, I believe the people in Glass House wanted to tell their stories, to present their experiences to a society they thought had been unwilling or unable to understand them. They decided they could trust me to record their way of life.Glass House seems to have been a tightly regulated community, indeed, seems to have been better organized than most communities and institutions on "the outside." How did they go about keeping order?They took turns doing essential duties, built what was needed with what they could find, and took care of one another. Each and every one was required to respect house rules, which were strict and detailed, covering almost every eventuality from overnight guests to police raids. Here, for instance, is the guest policy: "You can’t stay at Glass House unless you are the guest of a member. If you are the guest of a member, you can only sleep in his or her room. Glass House is not a crash pad. You can’t sleep in the community room or in any other part of the house. All guests must attend Sunday night meetings, so we know your face. Any strangers will be escorted to the door.You photographed Glass House from 1993 to 1994. Why did you wait so long to publish the material as a book?Four months after I began my work, the police stormed the building and evicted everyone. I put aside my photographs, transcripts, and notes and turned to other projects. Then, a few years ago, a letter from one of the Glass House survivors prompted me to trace all the other former residents. I was saddened to learn that five of them had died, and impressed that many others had dramatically changed their lives. One now lives in a eucalyptus forest on Maui; another is an organic gardener in Costa Rica; yet another is preparing for law school. But all I contacted told me that their months in Glass House had been a turning point in their lives. Also it seems right to present this chronicle of young squatters at a time when gentrification is erasing virtually all traces of the ethnic groups and radical fringe that once gave Alphabet City such great diversity and vitality., hardcover, Ausgabe: First Edition, Label: Penn State University Press, Penn State University Press, Produktgruppe: Book, Publiziert: 2004-09-16, Studio: Penn State University Press, Verkaufsrang: 487266
Platform order number Amazon.com: RMLW3MjFPvx0%2BVQ1DRWpZvLkfbOf XYpRkwOfE9QtVyDBRKJ75Xkkjy5m%2 BpjMeorsSC52DZoPXphMC8jHeOpRhq cAxRIJ2O8hY%2B7V2d5eMuHWC4iB9r AWPNuGPY16pSl0TBbHNDCBvGknkwnI 7ORdrg%3D%3D
Keywords: Books, Arts & Photography, Photography & Video, Architectural, Cities, Houses & Hotels, Photojournalism & Essays, Photo Essays, History, Americas, United States, State & Local, Politics & Social Sciences, Urban Planning & Development, Poverty, Sociology, Politics & Government, Specific Topics, Civics & Citizenship, Public Affairs & Policy, City Planning & Urban Development
Data from 12/14/2014 00:47h
ISBN (alternative notations): 0-271-02463-1, 978-0-271-02463-9
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